Redo Posterior Fossa Decompression with Duraplasty for the Treatment of Chiari Type I Malformation

Video Type: CVideo
  • 2-5 min videos of a particular surgery or technique. These again show major events in the surgery
  • Clearly annotated and narration is a must in these videos
  • These have clear but concise abstracts are not able to be indexed in PubMed
  • Distributed in newsletters, featured on our website and social media
  • Peer reviewed

Author: Gregory Albert
Published:
Specialties: Neurosurgery
Schools: Arkansas Children's Hospital, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
1 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 51 vote, average: 5.00 out of 5 (1 votes, average: 5.00 out of 5)
You need to be a registered member to rate this post.
Loading...

Chiari decompression is a common neurosurgical procedure.  Chiari malformations present with a number of symptoms including Valsalva-induced headaches, swallowing dysfunction, and sleep apnea.  Chiari malformations can also cause syringomyelia and syringobulbia.  Surgical procedures used for the treatment of Chiari malformation include bone-only decompression (posterior fossa craniectomy +/- cervical laminectomy), craniectomy/laminectomy with duraplasty, and craniectomy/laminectomy/duraplasty with shrinkage or resection of the cerebellar tonsils.  The procedure used depends on the specifics of the patient’s condition and the preference of the surgeon.

The patient presented here had undergone a prior Chiari decompression at the age of 20 months.  This was bone-only with posterior fossa craniectomy and C1-2 laminectomy.  The dura was not opened due to the presence of a venous lake.  He initially had improvement in his symptoms.  However, his headaches and snoring recurred, balance worsened, and dysphagia never improved.  Therefore, a repeat Chiari decompression at the age of 28 months was performed as presented here.

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply