Microlaryngoscopy in a Child with Normal Anatomy

Video Type: CVideo
  • 2-5 min videos of a particular surgery or technique. These again show major events in the surgery
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Author: Soham Roy
Published:
Specialties: Otolaryngology, Pediatric Surgery
Schools: University of Texas at Houston Medical School
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Basic Info

Contributor: Thomas Mitchell

A laryngoscope is used to allow magnified visualization of the anatomy of the larynx in a pediatric patient.  Labelled stills are used to demonstrate specific anatomy and landmarks.  This procedure is indicated to diagnose and/or treat pathology of the airway and vocal cords.  However, no pathology is seen in this patient.

Advanced

Procedure

Microlaryngoscopy in a Child with Normal Anatomy: The patient is placed under general anesthesia and intubated. A mouth retractor and guard is introduced to protect the teeth. The laryngoscope is advanced to allow for visualization of the structures of the larynx. The image is magnified and transmitted to binoculars and a separate screen.

Indications

Diagnosis of suspected laryngeal pathology as indicated by hoarseness, breathing difficulties, laryngeal trauma etc. Also, treatment of selected laryngeal pathology including removal of foreign objects, biopsy/removal of masses etc

Contraindications

Active bleeding or infection, specific anatomical malformations of the airway

Instrumentation

Setup

The patient is placed under general anesthesia and intubated. A mouth retractor and guard is introduced to protect the teeth. The laryngoscope is advanced to allow for visualization of the structures of the larynx.

Preoperative Workup

Complete history and focused physical exam with anesthesia evaluation

Anatomy and Landmarks

Labelled stills are used to demonstrate the anatomy at multiple levels from superior to inferior including the levels of the epiglottis, vocal cords, trachea, and carina.

Advantages/Disadvantages

Not Available.

Complications/Risks

Bleeding, infection, airway swelling, damage to teeth, vocal cord injury, complications of anesthesia

Disclosure of Conflicts

Not Available

Acknowledgements

Soham Roy, MD – surgeon; Thomas Mitchell – video editor

References

http://www.entnet.org/content/clinical-practice-guideline-hoarseness-dysphonia

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